Cathy Aranda
Cathy Aranda

How to Cite a Lecture in Various Styles | Examples & Tips

8 min read

Published on: Jun 20, 2024

Last updated on: Jul 22, 2024

how to cite a lecture

Imagine this: You listened to an interesting lecture that gave you great ideas. But when you want to use those ideas in your own work, you're stuck wondering, "How do I say where I heard this?" 

There's no clear rule for citing lectures, and that can make you feel uneasy. If you don't get it right, it might cause problems for your paper. 

Don't worry! This blog is here to help you understand how to cite talks properly using different citation styles

We'll explain the different ways to do it, making it easy for you to give credit the right way. We want to make sure you can use spoken information in your work without any stress. 

Let's learn together how to do it right!

How to Cite a Lecture - APA 7th Edition

Citing a lecture in APA (American Psychological Association) 7th Edition involves specific guidelines to ensure accurate and consistent source attribution.

Here are some key points to consider:

Personal Communication

APA guidelines state that lectures are considered personal communications, and they should be cited in the text of your APA paper but are not included in the reference list.

Include the speaker's name, the date(year, month, day) of the lecture, and a description of the communication in parentheses within the text.

Example: (J. Smith, personal communication, February 2, 2022)

Publicly Accessible Lectures

If the lecture is publicly accessible, such as through a website, it is treated more like a traditional source. In this case, include the lecture on the APA reference page.

  • Generic Format: Author, A. B. (Year). Title of the Lecture [Lecture]. Name of Course or Event, Name of Institution, Location. URL

Example: Smith, J. (2022). The Art of Writing [Lecture]. English Composition 101, ABC University, City. https://www.abcuniversity.edu/lecture123 

Publicly Accessible Talks at a Conference

If the talk at a conference is publicly accessible, like through a website, it should be included in the reference list following the APA format.

  • Generic Format: Author, A. B. (Year). Title of the Talk [Conference session]. Name of the Conference, URL or Location.

Example: Smith, J. (2022). Advancements in Technology [Conference session]. Annual Tech Conference, https://www.conferencewebsite.com 

Recorded or Transcribed Speeches

For recorded or transcribed speeches, when the material is publicly available, include it in the reference list using the following format.

  • Generic Format: Author, A. B. (Year). Title of the Speech [Audio podcast or Transcript]. Source or Platform.

Example: Smith, J. (2022). Inspirational Leadership [Audio podcast]. Podcast Platform.

How to Cite a Lecture - MLA Format

Citing a lecture in MLA format requires following particular guidelines to ensure the accurate attribution of spoken sources in your academic writing.

Publicly Accessible Lectures

When the lecture is available to the public, for instance, on a website, modify the citation format to accommodate this accessibility. 

This adaptation ensures that you accurately credit the spoken source in your academic or professional work.

  • Generic Format: Author, A. B. "Title of the Lecture." Name of Course or Event, Name of Institution, Location. Lecture Website.

Example: Smith, John. "Advancements in Technology." Annual Tech Conference, ABC University, City. [Lecture Website].

Recorded or Transcribed Speeches

If a lecture or speech is documented or transcribed within another source, like a website or a book, adhere to the formatting guidelines for that specific source type.

Also, add a short description at the end of the MLA Works Cited entry to explain what kind of source it is. 

  • Generic Format: Author, A. B. "Title of the Speech." Source or Platform. [URL or Source Information if applicable]. Speech [audio recording/video recording].

Example: Ginsburg, Ruth Bader. "Women's Rights Are Human Rights." TED Talks. [www.ted.com/tedx]. Speech video recording.

In-Person Lectures

For in-person lectures, the format is as follows:

  • Generic Format: Speaker's Last Name, First Name. "Title of the Lecture." Name of Course or Event, Name of Institution, Location, Date.

Example: Smith, John. "Effective Communication Strategies." Business Seminar, XYZ College, NewYork, 20 March, 2024.

How to Cite a Lecture in Chicago Style

In Chicago Notes and Bibliography citation style, you add sources using footnotes for in-text citations and create corresponding entries in the bibliography

Publicly Accessible Lectures

When citing a publicly accessible lecture in Chicago style, the bibliography entry should include the title of the lecture, the hosting event or institution, and a descriptive label like "Lecture" to specify the source type.

  • General Format: Speaker's Last Name, First Initial. (Year, Month, Day). Title of the Lecture. [Type of Lecture]. Name of the Event, Location. URL

Example: Smith, J.(2023, January 15). "Advancements in Technology." Lecture, Annual Tech Conference, ABC University, City. https://www.conferencewebsite.com 

Recorded or Transcribed Speeches

When citing a recorded or transcribed lecture in Chicago Notes and Bibliography style, the format depends on the type of source that contains it, such as a book, newspaper, or website. 

For instance, if you are referring to an audio recording of a speech hosted on a website, the citation refers as:

Example: Author, John. "Inspirational Leadership." Audio recording, Podcast Platform. [URL or Publisher, if applicable]

In this example, replace "John" with the actual speaker's name, "Inspirational Leadership" with the title of the speech, and provide the specific details of the podcast platform. 

Include the URL or publisher information based on where the recording is accessible. Adjust the details according to your specific source.

In-Person Lecture

This format includes the essential details such as the speaker's name, the date of the lecture, the title, the type of lecture (Lecture), the hosting event or institution, and the location.

  • General Format: Speaker's Last Name, First Initial. (Year, Month, Day). "Title of the Lecture." [Type of Lecture]. Name of the Event or Institution, Location.

Example: Smith, J. (2023, January 15). "Advancements in Technology." Lecture. Annual Tech Conference, ABC University, City.

How to Cite a Lecture in Harvard Style

In Harvard referencing, the format remains relatively consistent across various conditions, with minor adjustments based on the specific details of the source. 

Here are examples of different conditions:

Publicly Accessible Lecture

For a publicly accessible lecture, where the content is available on a website, ensure that a URL is provided for direct access.

Example: (Smith, J. 2022). Advancements in Technology. Annual Tech Conference, ABC University, City. [Accessed via the Conference Website: https://www.conferencewebsite.com]

Recorded or Transcribed Speeches

When citing recorded or transcribed speeches, adjust the citation format depending on the source’s availability.

Example: (Smith, J. 2022). Inspirational Leadership. Audio recording, Podcast Platform. [URL or Publisher, if applicable]

Remember to replace "Smith, J.," "Advancements in Technology," and "Inspirational Leadership" with the actual speaker's name and the specific title of the lecture or speech. 

Include the relevant details based on the type of source and its accessibility.

Expert Tip

Check out our blog on citation examples to get various other examples of citations according to different citation styles. 

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Cathy Aranda

WRITTEN BY

Cathy Aranda (Mass communication)

Cathy is a highly dedicated author who has been writing for the platform for over five years. With a Master's degree in Mass Communication, she is well-versed in various forms of writing such as articles, press releases, blog posts, and whitepapers. As an essay writing guide author at PerfectEssayWriter.ai, she has been helping students and professionals improve their writing skills by offering practical tips on research, citation, sentence structure, and style.

Cathy is a highly dedicated author who has been writing for the platform for over five years. With a Master's degree in Mass Communication, she is well-versed in various forms of writing such as articles, press releases, blog posts, and whitepapers. As an essay writing guide author at PerfectEssayWriter.ai, she has been helping students and professionals improve their writing skills by offering practical tips on research, citation, sentence structure, and style.

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